Publications

Bongaerts et al. 2010


scientific article | PLoS ONE | open access Open access small aa108fa7f478951c693af64a05bc4b46e6711dbb69a20809512a129d4d6b870f

Genetic Divergence across Habitats in the Widespread Coral Seriatopora hystrix and Its Associated Symbiodinium

Bongaerts P, Riginos C, Ridgway T, Sampayo EM, van Oppen MJH, Englebert N, Vermeulen F, Hoegh-Guldberg O

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Coral reefs are hotspots of biodiversity, yet processes of diversification in these ecosystems are poorly understood. The environmental heterogeneity of coral reef environments could be an important contributor to diversification, however, evidence supporting ecological speciation in corals is sparse. Here, we present data from a widespread coral species that reveals a strong association of host and symbiont lineages with specific habitats, consistent with distinct, sympatric gene pools that are maintained through ecologically-based selection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Populations of a common brooding coral, Seriatopora hystrix, were sampled from three adjacent reef habitats (spanning a āˆ¼30 m depth range) at three locations on the Great Barrier Reef (nā€Š=ā€Š336). The populations were assessed for genetic structure using a combination of mitochondrial (putative control region) and nuclear (three microsatellites) markers for the coral host, and the ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA for the algal symbionts (Symbiodinium). Our results show concordant genetic partitioning of both the coral host and its symbionts across the different habitats, independent of sampling location. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that coral populations and their associated symbionts can be highly structured across habitats on a single reef. Coral populations from adjacent habitats were found to be genetically isolated from each other, whereas genetic similarity was maintained across similar habitat types at different locations. The most parsimonious explanation for the observed genetic partitioning across habitats is that adaptation to the local environment has caused ecological divergence of distinct genetic groups within S. hystrix.

Research sites

10.1371   journal.pone.0010871
Keywords
Meta-data
Depth range
2- 27 m

Mesophotic “mentions”
0 x (total of 6798 words)

Fields
Molecular ecology Community structure

Research focus
Scleractinia (Hard Corals) Symbiodinium (zooxanthellae)

Locations
Australia - Great Barrier Reef

Research platforms
Diving - Regular Open-Circuit
Author profiles
Pim Bongaerts ( 24 pubs)
Norbert Englebert ( 8 pubs)