Publications:

Moffitt et al. 1989


scientific article | Bull Mar Sci

Community structure, biomass and productivity of deepwater artificial reefs in Hawaii

Moffitt RB, Parrish FA, Polovina JJ


Abstract

Artificial reef modules constructed of plastic or concrete were deployed at three sites in deep water on Penguin Bank, Hawaii, in October 1985. Fish communities were censused shortly after deployment and irregularly thereafter, by using the manned submersibles MAKALIl and PISCES V. In determining the aggregated biomass of transient fish species, depth of reef placement was more important than the reefs structural material and configuration. Conversely, reef structural material and configuration were more important than depth in determining the species diversity, richness and perhaps biomass of resident species attracted to these deepwater artificial reefs. Results suggest that small-scale, deepwater artificial reefs in Pacific island areas function primarily as devices for aggregating fish rather than increasing fish production and that reef configuration and structural material are not very important in aggregating transient species.

Keywords
Meta-data
Depth range
61- 117 m

Mesophotic “mentions”
1 x (total of 5446 words)

Classification
* Presents original data
* Focused on `mesophotic` depth range
* Focused on `mesophotic coral ecosystem`

Fields
Biodiversity
Community structure
Ecology

Focusgroups
Fishes

Locations
USA - Hawaii

Platforms
Manned Submersible

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