Publications:

Gaither et al. 2011


scientific article | PLoS ONE | open access

High connectivity in the deepwater snapper Pristipomoides filamentosus (Lutjanidae) across the Indo-Pacific with isolation of the Hawaiian Archipelago

Gaither MR, Jones SA, Kelley C, Newman SJ, Sorenson L, Bowen BW



Abstract

In the tropical Indo-Pacific, most phylogeographic studies have focused on the shallow-water taxa that inhabit reefs to approximately 30 m depth. Little is known about the large predatory fishes, primarily snappers (subfamily Etelinae) and groupers (subfamily Epinephelinae) that occur at 100–400 m. These long-lived, slow-growing species support fisheries across the Indo-Pacific, yet no comprehensive genetic surveys within this group have been conducted. Here we contribute the first range-wide survey of a deepwater Indo-Pacific snapper, Pristipomoides filamentosus, with special focus on Hawai’i. We applied mtDNA cytochrome b and 11 microsatellite loci to 26 samples (N = 1,222) collected across 17,000 km from Hawai’i to the western Indian Ocean. Results indicate that P. filamentosus is a highly dispersive species with low but significant population structure (mtDNA WST = 0.029, microsatellite FST = 0.029) due entirely to the isolation of Hawai’i. No population structure was detected across 14,000 km of the Indo-Pacific from Tonga in the Central Pacific to the Seychelles in the western Indian Ocean, a pattern rarely observed in reef species. Despite a long pelagic phase (60–180 days), interisland dispersal as adults, and extensive gene flow across the Indo-Pacific, P. filamentosus is unable to maintain population connectivity with Hawai’i. Coalescent analyses indicate that P. filamentosus may have colonized Hawai’i 26 K– 52 K y ago against prevailing currents, with dispersal away from Hawai’i dominating migration estimates. P. filamentosus harbors low genetic diversity in Hawai’i, a common pattern in marine fishes, and our data indicate a single archipelago-wide stock. However, like the Hawaiian Grouper, Hyporthodus quernus, this snapper had several significant pairwise comparisons (FST) clustered around the middle of the archipelago (St. Rogatien, Brooks Banks, Gardner) indicating that this region may be isolated or (more likely) receives input from Johnston Atoll to the south.

Keywords
Meta-data
Depth range
100- 400 m

Mesophotic “mentions”
0 x (total of 9526 words)

Classification
* Presents original data
* Focused on `mesophotic` depth range
* Focused on `mesophotic coral ecosystem`

Fields
Connectivity
Evolution
Fisheries

Focusgroups
Fishes

Locations
Australia - Northern Australia
Australia - Scott Reef
Australia - Western Australia
New Caledonia
Tonga
USA - Hawaii
Christmas Island
Seychelles
Micronesia - Guam

Platforms
Fishing

Author profiles